Skip to content
Open menu Close menu

Why the law needs to be a leader, not a mere reactor, in the Artificial Intelligence revolution

Why the law needs to be a leader, not a mere reactor, in the Artificial Intelligence revolution

Location: City Campus

Date and Time:
Thu 1 Mar 2018, 17:00 - 18:00

Duration: One hour

Can robots be recognised as having legal personality? Can they be held accountable for their own actions? Ian Miller, Barrister and Deputy Head of the School of Law, will consider how the introduction of Artificial Intelligence demands greater and more proactive scrutiny from the law, lawyers and legislators.

Traditionally the law has been slow to react to new technologies; tending to respond in a measured way, on a case-by-case basis. Unlike the courts who frequently act as a driver for social change, invariably striking the correct balance ahead of parliament. Law studies contemplates change and develops incrementally, never rushing ahead of the game. The law's approach to societal changes, such as social media, highlight this issue of slow adaption.

The introduction of AI will need the law to consider liability, both civil and criminal, from acts carried out by robots or other intelligent insentients; the capacity of inanimate objects to cause harm despite the absence of any act or oversight by a person.

How do issues of morality and a sense of right or wrong feature and what should the law say about this?

We need innovators and creators working alongside lawyers. Legal solutions must be put into place before AI technologies become integrated into society at large, so that the law is not left to provide solutions for situations that it could have, should have, prevented in the first place.

Share this