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Miss Corinne Fulcher

PositionResearch student
LocationRichmond building, room G39
DepartmentOptometry and Vision Science
Telephone+44 (0) 1274 236230
Emailc.fulcher@student.bradford.ac.uk
Twitter@coso87
LinkedInVisit my LinkedIn profile

Research Interests (key words only)

Human time perception, Psychophysics, Vision.

Teaching and Supervisory Responsibilities

  • Supervision of a range of undergraduate teaching clinics.

Biography

I qualified as an Optometrist in 2009 and worked in practice full-time for over four years. During this time I became accredited with the Local Enhanced Services scheme to provide additional eye care services within North Yorkshire, and helped with the supervision of two pre-registration students.

I began my PhD in 2013, researching the mechanisms of human time perception using psychophysical techniques. Whilst at the University of Bradford I have presented my research at both national and international conferences, winning a prize in 2016 for “Best Paper” at the British Congress of Optometry and Vision Science for my talk on “The binocularity of visual time”.

In addition, in 2016 I was also awarded the Master’s Medal from the Worshipful Company of Spectacle Makers in 2016 for my paper entitled “Object size determines the spatial spread of visual time”.

Study History

  • Optometry BSc (Hons), 2008, Cardiff University
  • LES Accreditation for North Yorkshire, 2011

Professional History

  • Optometrist, 2008–2013, Boots Opticians, York.
  • Locum Optometrist, 2012 – present.

Professional Activities

  • Member of General Optical Council.
  • Member of Association of Optometrists.
  • STEM Ambassador in West Yorkshire.
  • Professional member of the Macular Society.

Research Areas

  • Human time perception.

Research Collaborations

  • I work in collaboration with colleagues at the University of Nottingham and Cardiff University.

Publications

  • Fulcher, C., McGraw, P.V., Roach, N.W., Whitaker, D. and Heron, J., (2016). Object size determines the spatial spread of visual time. Proc. R. Soc. B. 283 (1835).  doi:10.1098/rspb.2016.1024.

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